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Effective January 1, 2015, employers will be able to offer Get in 2 College to their employees and employee families as a low cost employee benefit.  For an annual cost of just $1 or less per month per employee (see pricing based on number of employees), employers can make our products available to employees and their families:  their children, grandchildren, or other student relatives.  Almost all employees deal with the stress and workload associated with college admission when a child or loved one is going through the time consuming process of researching, preparing, and applying.  We can help by relieving the stress and providing convenient access to a wealth of helpful advice and resources.  High Schools are doing their best, but may be overburdened and under-budgeted.  Supplement their assistance with ours and enable your employees to concentrate on their jobs – not college admissions.

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Effective January 1, 2015 Get in 2 College has a new look AND new ways to access our products! The Get in 2 College materials will now be available not only to high school counseling departments, but will be sold directly to students/families on a one-time, individual use only basis. We will also be doing more to reach districts and consortiums, so as to bring our discounts to more schools nationwide. Lastly, we are launching a new program to bring Get in 2 College to families as an employee benefit by reaching out to employers and their Human Resources/Benefits leaders.

 

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If one or both of your parents attended a particular college, then you are a “legacy” there. But does it help your chances for admission? Gone are the days when it’s almost a guarantee, but in the case of two equally qualified students it almost certainly tips the scale. Those who support this practice argue that it supports tradition and alumni networks, and results in financial donations that benefit all students. But some studies show that an applicant’s chances for admission went up considerably (up to 45% points) if they had legacy status. Is that going too far? Does it also tend to favor the wealthy? There will always be two sides to this debate. Meanwhile, don’t assume that being a legacy will get you admitted.

 

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College rankings are “all the buzz”, but should be taken only as one small component of your research.  The rankings are based on a variety of criteria, and it is unclear if some may even be influenced by fees. But if you proceed with caution, they can still be interesting and may provide some relative comparisons that are useful.  US News & World Report is probably the best known ranking source at http://www.usnews.com/info/blogs/press-room/2014/09/09/us-news-announces-the-2015-best-colleges.  But some less known comparisons can be found by cautious web searching. For example, http://www.collegegrid.com/rankings/rankings_universities.php is another interesting resource.  Just don’t get too focused on rankings – there are many more important factors in your selection.